Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

Univerity of California, Irvine College of Medicine

The Zeta Chapter of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

Student Research Fellowship Recipients

Recipient in 1999: Amir Karamzadeh

Laser-mediated cartilage reshaping with feedback-controlled cryogen spray cooling: biophysical properties and viability

Amir Karamzadeh began working as a medical student (and continues working as a resident in the UCI Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery) at the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic in the laboratory of Dr. Brian J.F. Wong. His research focused on the fundamental study of laser-tissue interaction and the development of laser cartilage reshaping technology for use in head and neck reconstruction. He was awarded the Alpha Omega Alpha Student Research Fellowship in 1999 to fund a basic science project that looked at the relationship between laser dosimetry, cryogen spray cooling, cartilage reshaping, and tissue viability. This work was later presented at the American Society for Lasers in Medicine and Surgery and was the recipient of the Joel Noe Research Award from the Society.

Publication
Karamzadeh, A.M, Tanenbaum, B.S., Rasouli, A, Milner, T.E., Nelson, J.S., Wong, B.J.F, Laser-mediated cartilage reshaping with feedback-controlled cryogen spray cooling: biophysical properties and viability. Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 2001, 28;1-10

He has subsequently published over ten articles in this field and presented at many national and international conferences. He has also received several awards including the UCI College of Medicine Dean's Office Research Fellowship and the J. Gordon Hatfield, MD Surgical Award.

The next step he will be working on is to study the basic principles of cartilage thermoforming in an animal model to help elucidate the efficacy of these methods. The long-term hope is to one day apply this technology toward the treatment of difficult problems in head and neck reconstruction.